History

Classes

HIST& 126 : World Civilizations I

Historical comparative study of the world’s major civilizations (African, Asian, Middle East, European, and American) from prehistory to ca.1200 CE. There will be an emphasis on material existence and understanding value systems. We will delve into how these are expressed in different political, social, economic, cultural, and religious systems as well as in literature and art. (SS)

Credits

5

HIST& 127 : World Civilizations II

Comparative study of the world’s major civilizations (African, Asian, Middle East, European, and American) from roughly 1200 CE to 1815. There will be an emphasis on material existence and understanding value systems. We will delve into how these are expressed in different political, social, economic, cultural and religious systems as well as in literature and art. (SS)

Credits

5

HIST& 128 : World Civilizations III

Comparative historical study of the world's major civilizations (African, Asian, Middle East, European, and American) from the beginning of industrialization to today’s global world. There will be an emphasis on material existence and understanding value systems. We will delve into how these are expressed in different political, social, economic, cultural, and religious systems as well as in literature and art. (SS)

Credits

5

HIST& 146 : U.S. History I

United States development from European settlements clinging tenuously on the Atlantic coast, or wayward outposts in the Southeast and Southwest, to a large .relatively unified nation between two oceans. We will examine the people of North America, Europe and Africa before colonialism and then address the social, cultural, economic and geographical determinants for colonization. We will explore how colonists began to see themselves separate from the mother country and how this resulted in revolution and a new nation. (SS)

Credits

5

HIST& 147 : U.S. History II

United States evolvement after the early years of nation building. The course will begin at the end of the Jacksonian Reform era, and end with the period of overseas expansion as the United States become a Great Power nation. This course will examine a number of crisis or issues of change, including civil war, western expansion, industrialization, immigration and urbanization. The student will learn how the people of the United States responded to crisis periods through reform movements such as Populism, unionization, Progressivism and imperialism. (SS)

Credits

5

HIST& 148 : U.S. History III

The third part of the History of the United States examines the 20th century starting with World War I. In this period attention directed toward the development of the United States as a modern nationstate. We will cover the process industrialization, urbanization, and immigration that shaped the contours of the country right into the 21st century. Other topics of interest in the larger processes will be the Great Depression, Imperialism, World War I and II, the Cold War, environmentalism, nuclear war and terrorism. The course will end as the United States enters the post-Cold War era. (SS)

Credits

5

HIST& 214 : Pacific Northwest History

With emphasis on the states of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, Pacific Northwest (PNW) history proceeds through five main periods: indigenous peoples, European discovery, colonialism, industrial development, and regional control. The course emphasizes understanding social (ethnicity, race, and gender) differences, economic and political organization, and cultural values of the different historical periods.

Credits

5