Integrated Studies

Courses

IS 101: Understanding the Humanities

Credits 5

Introduction to a range of artistic and intellectual expressions of what it means to be human. Areas explored may include architecture, dance, film, language, literature, music, painting, philosophy, photography, sculpture, and/ or theater. Discussion of these expressions, themes and styles, as well as their cultural, historical, and theoretical contexts. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Humanities, Elective)

IS 102: Comparative Arts

Credits 5

Exploration of thematic and stylistic connections between art forms, focusing on both theory and creative application. Art forms may include painting, photography, sculpture, dance, poetry, fiction, theater, film, and music. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Humanities, Elective)

IS 103: Women’s Voices Arts and Humanities

Credits 5

Exploration of women’s voices and works in the Arts and Humanities from specific time periods and mediums. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Humanities, Elective)

IS 105: Popular Culture

Credits 5

Historical as well as cross-cultural study of popular literary and nonliterary texts, such as novels, magazines, comic books, films, television shows, advertisements, social media, superhero tales, music videos, and fashion trends. Focus on popular myths, icons, heroes, and/or rituals that have affected peoples’ lives and attitudes. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Humanities, Elective)

IS 107: History of Reason

Credits 5

Exploration of a theme, area of knowledge, or period of intellectual history, focusing on seminal ideas and paradigm shifts. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Humanities, Elective)

IS 109: Introduction to Indigenous Humanities

Credits 5

Introduction to a range of artistic and intellectual expressions of what it means to be human with particular attention to distinct paradigms that reflect indigenous history, culture, arts, and philosophies. Areas of attention/concentration include but are not limited to architecture, dance, film, language, literature, music, painting, philosophy, sculpture, and performance. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Humanities, Elective)

IS 120: Indigenous Humanities: Language, Culture, and Indigenous Futures

Credits 5

Include the study of a range of artistic and intellectual expressions of what it means to be human with particular attention to language revitalization, place-based knowledge and expression, and interdisciplinary approaches to the humanities. Co-taught with an instructor of record and at least one but up to three co-teachers who are culture teachers or language teachers from indigenous tribes including but not limited to the Tribes of the Olympic Peninsula. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Humanities, Elective)

IS 150: Foundations of Knowledge

Credits 5

An introductory course that explores the nature of knowledge and its pursuit from the primary academic disciplines of mathematics, humanities, natural sciences and social sciences. An emphasis is placed on establishing linkages across these disciplines to expand the realm of possible discourse. Students will develop and apply critical thinking, communication, and self-assessment skills, along with the ability to integrate multiple perspectives. As part of the class, students will engage in interdisciplinary readings and discussions of seminal ideas on a common theme to be determined by the instructor. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Humanities, Elective)

IS 201: Service Learning

Credits 5

This course combines meaningful service experience with selected resources, assignments and self-reflection to build real- world professional competencies. Through a service project with a local community partner, students will gain hands-on experience as it relates to their academic area of interest. This course goes beyond internships and volunteer work by empowering students to apply classroom learning to current social issues and community needs. Course meetings and activities are built around learner-centered reflection, peer discussion and field experiences for a variety of disciplines. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Elective)