Integrated Studies

Classes

IS 101 : Understanding the Humanities

Introduction to a range of artistic and intellectual expressions of what it means to be human. Areas explored may include architecture, dance, film, language, literature, music, painting, philosophy, photography, sculpture, and/ or theater. Discussion of these expressions, themes and styles, as well as their cultural, historical, and theoretical contexts. (H)

Credits

5

IS 102 : Comparative Arts

Exploration of thematic and stylistic connections between art forms, focusing on both theory and creative application. Art forms may include painting, photography, sculpture, dance, poetry, fiction, theater, film, and music. (H)

Credits

5

IS 105 : Popular Culture

Historical as well as cross-cultural study of popular literary and nonliterary texts, such as novels, magazines, comic books, films, television shows, advertisements, social media, superhero tales, music videos, and fashion trends. Focus on popular myths, icons, heroes, and/ or rituals that have affected peoples’ lives and attitudes. (H)

Credits

5

IS 107 : History of Reason

Exploration of a theme, area of knowledge, or period of intellectual history, focusing on seminal ideas and paradigm shifts.(H)

Credits

5

IS 108 : Oral History I

Use of current media technologies, including video, desktop publishing, and web technology to research and document the oral history of specific aspects of the local community. Focus on research, writing, video production, and bringing anthropological perspectives to the gathering of oral history. Final products will be video interviews, short documentaries, a website, and a printed newsletter. (E)

Credits

2

IS 109 : Introduction to Indigenous Humanities

Introduction to a range of artistic and intellectual expressions of what it means to be human with particular attention to distinct paradigms that reflect indigenous history, culture, arts, and philosophies. Areas of attention/concentration include but are not limited to architecture, dance, film, language, literature, music, painting, philosophy, sculpture, and performance. (H)

Credits

5

IS 201 : Service Learning

This course combines meaningful service experience with selected resources, assignments and selfreflection to build real- world professional competencies. Through a service project with a local community partner, students will gain hands-on experience as it relates to their academic area of interest. This course goes beyond internships and volunteer work by empowering students to apply classroom learning to current social issues and community needs. Course meetings and activities are built around learner-centered reflection, peer discussion and field experiences for a variety of disciplines. (E)

Credits

5

IS 302 : Visions of Utopia

If some forms of social life are better than others, which form would be best? This course will investigate this question in a cross-disciplinary manner by examining conceptions of the ideal utopian society as expressed in classic writings from philosophy and literature. Potential authors include Plato, More, Marx, Nietzsche, Hawthorne, Thoreau, Skinner, Burgess, and Nozick.

Credits

5