Biology

Courses

BIOL& 100: Survey of Biology with Lab

Credits 5

Introduction to the structural and functional characteristics of life. Surveys the evolutionary, ecological, cellular, and genetic biology of living organisms. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Natural Sciences)

BIOL& 160: General Biology with Lab, Cell Biology Emphasis

Credits 5

Includes process of science, overview of central ideas of biology (unity, diversity, interdependence, evolution), basic chemistry concepts, biomolecules, cell structure, cell physiology (including enzyme function, energetics, synthesis of DNA, RNA and protein), cell reproduction, introduction to genetics. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Natural Sciences)

BIOL& 221: Ecology and Evolution with Lab

Credits 5

First course in the three-quarter sequence of introductory biology for science students. An introduction to evolutionary and ecological processes involved in the generation of our planet’s biodiversity, including a review of patterns and processes that influence the origin, evolution, distribution, and abundance of living things. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Natural Sciences)

BIOL& 222: Molecular & Cellular Biology with Lab

Credits 5

Second course in the three-quarter sequence of introductory biology for science students. Introduction to structure and function of biomolecules, cells, and membranes; photosynthesis and respiration; molecular origin of life; phylogenetic and metabolic diversity of prokaryotes; and molecular genetics and genomics. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Natural Sciences)

BIOL& 223: Organismal Biology with Lab

Credits 5

Third course in the three-quarter sequence of introductory biology for science students. Introduction to the study of the structure and function of plants and animals and how they cope with varying environmental conditions. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Natural Sciences)

BIOL& 241: Human Anatomy & Physiology I with Lab

Credits 5

Structure and function of the human body. Homeostasis; tissues; integumentary, skeletal, nervous, and muscular systems. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Natural Sciences)

BIOL& 242: Human Anatomy & Physiology II with Lab

Credits 5

Cardiovascular system; lymphatic system; immunology; respiratory system; digestive system; metabolism; urinary system; endocrine system; reproductive system; and genetics. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Elective)

BIOL& 260: Microbiology with Lab

Credits 5

Introduction to bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms. Includes microbial structure, metabolism, genetics, ecology, technological applications, microbial diseases of humans, immunology, public health, and medical control strategies. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Natural Sciences)

BIOL 150: Introduction to Marine Biology with Lab

Credits 5

Hands-on approach utilizing facilities at local marine laboratory, field trips, and group projects to learn biological concepts relevant to marine biology. Emphasis on local organisms and ecology. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Natural Sciences)

BIOL 161: General Biology I with Lab

Credits 5

First course in the two-quarter sequence of introductory biology for forestry students. Topics include cell structure and function, cellular energy metabolism, photosynthesis, genetics, and various facets of zoology, including anatomy and physiology, physiological ecology, and development. Current research will be used to illustrate the scientific and social importance of these topics. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Natural Sciences)

BIOL 162: General Biology II with Lab

Credits 5

Second course in the two-quarter sequence of introductory biology for forestry students. Topics include plant growth and survival, photosynthesis, and plant/ environmental interactions, evolution and diversity of living plants and animals, fundamentals of ecology, and conservation biology. Current research will be used to illustrate the scientific and social importance of these topics. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Natural Sciences)

BIOL 250: Introduction to SCOPE Capstone Project

Credits 2

SCOPE capstone projects are opportunities for you to actively partake in an authentic undergraduate research experience that explores some aspect of the science and culture of the Olympic Peninsula. This course begins by examining a variety of undergraduate research experiences (or REUs) in regional natural and cultural resources as a way of exploring topics for student capstones. By the end of this course, students will have selected a project topic and developed a capstone proposal with a realistic scope and timeline. Capstone projects continue for 3 quarters and allow in-depth exploration. Recommended that this course be taken concurrently with BIOL 299: Field Methods in Ecology. This class may include students from multiple sections.

BIOL 283: Native Plant Propagation: Fall

Credits 2 3

Learn how to propagate native plants for local restoration projects. Through hands on training, students will propagate native plants from seed and live cuttings. Plants produced for this class will be used for various revegetation projects on the Olympic Peninsula. BOT 101 recommended but not required. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Elective)

BIOL 284: Native Plant Propagation: Winter

Credits 2 3

(Formerly BIOL 291E) Learn how to propagate native plants for local restoration projects.  Through hands on training, students will propagate native plants from seed and live cuttings.  Plants produced for this class will be used for various revegetation projects on the Olympic Peninsula. BOT 101 and BIOL 283 recommended but not required. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Elective)

BIOL 285: Native Plant Propagation: Spring

Credits 2 3

(Formerly BIOL 291C) Learn how to propagate native plants for local restoration projects. Through hands on training, students will propagate native plants from seed and live cuttings. Plants produced for this class will be used for various revegetation projects on the Olympic Peninsula. BOT 101 recommended but not required. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Elective)

BIOL 286: Elwha Restoration Research

Credits 3

(Formerly BIOL 291D) Elwha Ecosystem Restoration, the second largest restoration project ever undertaken by the National Park Service, presents unique opportunities to learn about forest development and restoration assessment techniques in the Pacific Northwest. Olympic National Park implemented an unprecedented revegetation program in conjunction with dam removal, planting over 300,000 trees and shrubs to accelerate forest development in the former reservoirs. Understanding how planting efforts influence forest succession is critical to future dam removal and other salmon restoration projects. Learn how to conduct scientific surveys of restoration sites, identify native and non-native trees and shrubs in the winter, organize and manage data and identify factors driving forest development. BOT 101 and BIOL 285 recommended but not required. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Elective) 

BIOL 290-294: Undergraduate Research in Biology

Credits 1 5

Students serve as active members on research teams working to advance knowledge in biological science. Dependent upon the project, students will participate in hypothesis formation, experimental design, data collection, analysis, and determination of conclusions. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Elective)

BIOL 299: Field Methods in Ecology

Credits 2

This course will introduce students to common field methods used in ecological studies through field data collection in local areas. Students will learn how to measure and evaluate field studies data including vegetation/restoration studies, wildlife monitoring (invertebrates, birds, other), and water quality of aquatic systems (freshwater and marine). The course will cover the field research process, from question development to results. BIOL& 100 or BOT 101 recommended but not required. This class may include students from multiple sections.