Transfer Degree

Associate in Computer Science, Direct Transfer Agreement/Major Related Program (DTA/MRP)

Area of Study
Information Technology

Degree Requirements

The Associate in Computer Science, Direct Transfer Agreement/Major Related Program (DTA/MRP) is applicable to students planning to prepare for computer science and related majors at universities and colleges in Washington. This degree guide meets all of the requirements of the Direct Transfer Agreement (DTA). 

Students should check specific requirements of their intended transfer institution, including overall minimum GPA, a higher GPA in a selected subset of courses or a specific minimum grade in one or more courses such as math or English. To qualify for this degree, you must complete a minimum of 90 credits in courses numbered 100 or above, with a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 or better. Computer Science programs are competitive and may require a higher GPA overall or a higher GPA in specific courses.

View the Associate in Computer Science DTA/MRP document for specific university requirements and confer with your advisor.

Communication Skills

Catalog #
Title
Credits
5

Active reading, effective writing, and critical thinking, using subjective and objective approaches. Introduction to research techniques. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Communication Skills)

Credits: 5

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5

Develop professional skills in research, design, and communication of technical information. Emphasis on audience analysis, clear and effective writing style, and use of visual elements. Composition of documents in a variety of professional formats such as memos, proposals, progress reports, completion reports, lab reports, and instruction manuals. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Formerly ENGL 150, Elective)

Credits: 5

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Sub-Total Credits
10

Quantitative Skills

Catalog #
Title
Credits
5

Limits and continuity; techniques and applications of derivatives of algebraic and transcendental functions; an introduction to antiderivatives. This class may include students from multiple sections. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Quantitative Skills, Natural Sciences, Elective)

Credits: 5

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Sub-Total Credits
5

MATH& 141 and MATH& 142 are required prerequisites and count as electives in Remaining Credits.

Humanities

Catalog #
Title
Credits
Humanities Distribution List (Computer Science)  +

Fifteen credits in three areas.
Max five credits in performance.

15
Sub-Total Credits
15

Natural Sciences

Catalog #
Title
Credits
5

Basic principles of mechanics and experiments in mechanics for physical science and engineering majors. One year high school physics is recommended. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Natural Sciences with Lab, Elective)

Credits: 5

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5

Basic principles of electromagnetism, the mechanics of oscillatory motion, and experiments in these topics for physical science and engineering majors. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Elective)

Credits: 5

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5

Integration involving algebraic and transcendental functions. Applications of integration, including an introduction to differential equations. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Quantitative Skills, Natural Sciences, Elective)

Credits: 5

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Sub-Total Credits
15

Social Sciences

Catalog #
Title
Credits
Social Sciences Distribution List (Computer Science)  +

Fifteen credits in three areas.

15
Sub-Total Credits
15

Pre-Major Requirements

Catalog #
Title
Credits
5

This course introduces the "algorithmic thinking" and the design and implementation processes necessary for you to solve complex, real-world problems with computers. We introduce the Java programming language to learn to write programs; understand the features of programming languages; decompose problems; develop algorithms; and use important software practices. We include software architecture (structure), classes (ways of modeling things), handling data, some computer ethics, standards, and maintaining program correctness. This course and its successor, CS 142 will help you become more competent and comfortable on the paths to both computer science and professional software development. CS 100 is strongly recommended for students with no programming experience. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Elective)

Credits: 5

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5

This course continues CS& 141, delving more deeply into computer science principles and professional software development principles and practices. We cover and use object-oriented and functional programming paradigms, basic top-down context-derived software processes and architectures, abstract data types, generics, data structures, recursion, complexity analysis of algorithms and O-notation, computer ethics, handling and querying data, unit tests, developing to standards, modeling physical processes, graphical user interfaces. We use a modern, intelligent professional development environment to implement concepts concretely. This course will help you become more competent and comfortable on the paths to both computer science and professional software development. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Elective)

Credits: 5

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Sub-Total Credits
10

CS 100 is strongly recommended for students new to computer programming as a prerequisite to CS& 141.

Remaining Credits

Work with an advisor to choose electives based on your interests, planned major, and transfer institution.

Catalog #
Title
Credits
Elective  +

Take any course 100 level or above.

5
Elective or MATH& 141  +
5
Elective or MATH& 142  +
5
Sub-Total Credits
20

Elective + MATH& 141 and MATH& 142 may be used if taken as a prerequisite for MATH& 151.

Communication Competencies

  • Comprehend the difference between written opinions vs ideas supported by scientific inquiry.
  • Demonstrate the ability to communicate scientific ideas and the process of science.

Quantitative Reasoning

  • Manipulate numbers (large and small), use common measurement systems, and solve simple linear algebraic problems.
  • Recognize functional relationships between and among measurable phenomena.
  • Apply systematic approaches and logic to solving quantitative problems.
  • Translate mathematical symbols into words and words into mathematical symbols.
  • Demonstrate the ability to use modeling and simulation to solve scientific problems.

Information Competencies

  • Recognize the difference between questions of high scientific impact vs those unlikely to provide critical information about a scientific phenomenon or process.
  • Ability to apply the process of science.

Critical Thinking

  • Identify and troubleshoot scientific problems.
  • Demonstrate the ability to use quantitative reasoning and analyze data.
  • Demonstrate the ability to apply the process of science.

Personal and Interpersonal Competencies

  • Gain an understanding of the relationships between science and society.
  • Gain familiarity with and an appreciation for the interdisciplinary nature of science.
  • Demonstrate the ability to collaborate and understand the importance of collaboration in science.
Total Credits
90

First Quarter (Fall)

Catalog #
Title
Credits
5

An introduction to fundamentals of computer science. Topics covered include algorithmic design; problem-solving techniques for computer programming; fundamentals of digital logic and computer organization; the role of the operating system; introductory programming methodology, including variables, assignment statements, control statements and subroutines (methods); programming paradigms; the compilation process; theoretical limits of computation; database structures; and social and ethical issues. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Natural Sciences, Elective)

Credits: 5

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5

Active reading, effective writing, and critical thinking, using subjective and objective approaches. Introduction to research techniques. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Communication Skills)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Analysis of linear, piecewise, quadratic, polynomial, rational, inverse, exponential, and logarithmic functions; their applications; and their graphs. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Quantitative Skills, Natural Sciences, Elective)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

Sub-Total Credits
15

Second Quarter (Winter)

Catalog #
Title
Credits
5

This course introduces the "algorithmic thinking" and the design and implementation processes necessary for you to solve complex, real-world problems with computers. We introduce the Java programming language to learn to write programs; understand the features of programming languages; decompose problems; develop algorithms; and use important software practices. We include software architecture (structure), classes (ways of modeling things), handling data, some computer ethics, standards, and maintaining program correctness. This course and its successor, CS 142 will help you become more competent and comfortable on the paths to both computer science and professional software development. CS 100 is strongly recommended for students with no programming experience. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Elective)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Develop professional skills in research, design, and communication of technical information. Emphasis on audience analysis, clear and effective writing style, and use of visual elements. Composition of documents in a variety of professional formats such as memos, proposals, progress reports, completion reports, lab reports, and instruction manuals. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Formerly ENGL 150, Elective)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Conic sections; trigonometric functions; identities; inverse trigonometric functions; trigonometric equations; solutions of right triangles; laws of sines and cosines; vectors; polar coordinates; and complex numbers. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Quantitative Skills, Natural Sciences, Elective)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

Sub-Total Credits
15

Third Quarter (Spring)

Catalog #
Title
Credits
5

This course continues CS& 141, delving more deeply into computer science principles and professional software development principles and practices. We cover and use object-oriented and functional programming paradigms, basic top-down context-derived software processes and architectures, abstract data types, generics, data structures, recursion, complexity analysis of algorithms and O-notation, computer ethics, handling and querying data, unit tests, developing to standards, modeling physical processes, graphical user interfaces. We use a modern, intelligent professional development environment to implement concepts concretely. This course will help you become more competent and comfortable on the paths to both computer science and professional software development. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Elective)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

Humanities  +
5
Social Sciences  +
5
Sub-Total Credits
15

Fourth Quarter (Fall)

Catalog #
Title
Credits
5

Limits and continuity; techniques and applications of derivatives of algebraic and transcendental functions; an introduction to antiderivatives. This class may include students from multiple sections. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Quantitative Skills, Natural Sciences, Elective)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Basic principles of mechanics and experiments in mechanics for physical science and engineering majors. One year high school physics is recommended. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Natural Sciences with Lab, Elective)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

Social Sciences  +
5
Sub-Total Credits
15

Fifth Quarter (Winter)

Catalog #
Title
Credits
Humanities  +
5
5

Integration involving algebraic and transcendental functions. Applications of integration, including an introduction to differential equations. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Quantitative Skills, Natural Sciences, Elective)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Basic principles of electromagnetism, the mechanics of oscillatory motion, and experiments in these topics for physical science and engineering majors. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Elective)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

Sub-Total Credits
15

Sixth Quarter (Spring)

Catalog #
Title
Credits
Humanities  +
5
Social Sciences  +
5
Sub-Total Credits
15