Distribution List of Approved Courses (AA & AA-Honors):

Communication Skills Requirement

Catalog #
Title
Credits
5
Active reading, effective writing, and critical thinking, using subjective and objective approaches. Introduction to research techniques. This class will include students from multiple sections. (CC)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5
Reading and writing using analytical and critical approaches. One or more research papers. Builds on concepts introduced in ENGL& 101. This class will include students from multiple sections. (CC)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

Sub-Total Credits
10

Quantitative Skills Requirement

A specific course may be credited to no more than one distribution or skill area requirement.

Catalog #
Title
Credits
MATH& 107 or above  +
5
5

Introduction to first-order symbolic logic. Topics include symbolizing, truth tables, truth trees, proofs for sentence and predicate logic with identity, conditional and indirect proof, and invalidating interpretations. (Quantitative Skills, Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

Sub-Total Credits
10

Humanities

Minimum of fifteen credits from Humanities distribution in three separate subject areas. 

Requirements

Catalog #
Title
Credits
5

Study of two and three dimensional art concepts. Lectures and selected art projects. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Applies principles of art, combining theories of creative thinking and modern design. Problems in organization of compositional elements and two dimensional space concepts.  This class may include students from multiple sections.  (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

This course is an introduction to the elements and principles of three dimensional design. We will work with diverse materials to create sculptural forms that develop each student’s personal expression and critical thinking skills.  This class may include students from multiple sections.  (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Intensive study of line, value, perspective, and form, using various drawing mediums that offer a new way of seeing through investigation of visual language of drawing. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Intensive study of color and drawn forms offers new approach for seeing. Time divided between traditional and contemporary drawing techniques. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Experimental drawing, experience of drawing and seeing and possibilities of extending traditional concepts about drawing. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Painting from past through present. Exploration of beginning painting techniques, concepts, composition problems.  This class may include students from multiple sections.  (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

The course is an introduction to creating drawings based on in-class observations of a range of posed models. The class also provides an overview of the drawing process as a form of visual thinking in relation to rendering the human figure through a variety of techniques and art-making materials ranging from charcoal and graphite to color pastels and acrylic paint. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

The art of ancient civilizations, beginning with Paleolithic cave painting and megalithic monuments. Indian, Chinese, Japanese, Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Minoan, Greek, Etruscan, Roman, Early Christian, and Byzantine artistic traditions are studied in light of their cultural origins. Illustrated lectures. This class may include students from multiple sections.  (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

The art of western civilization from the early middle ages through the French revolution is considered. Periods explored include the Islamic, Carolingian, Celtic, Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, Mannerist, Baroque, and Rococo. Illustrated lectures. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

The art of the modern age is explored. Developments studied include Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, the Fauves, Art Nouveau, Cubism, Surrealism, Regionalism, Abstraction, Pop Art, and Post Modernism. Illustrated lectures.  This class may include students from multiple sections.  (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

This course is an introduction to ceramics based materials and creative process, with emphasis on personal expression through diverse practices. Students create a series of projects utilizing a variety of traditional and innovative hand building techniques and processes to create three dimensional sculptural forms. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

This course is an introduction to ceramics materials and creative processes, using the potter’s wheel. Students create a series of projects utilizing a variety of traditional and innovative throwing techniques and firing processes to create functional forms. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Expanded study of ASL with emphasis on conversation skills and story telling; continued expansion of knowledge of Deaf culture and Deaf community.  This class may include students from multiple sections.  (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

CMST& 102, CMST 201, 207, 208, 209  +
5
CMST& 210 or CMST& 220  +
5
5

Introduction to history, art, and craft of theater. Plays are read and discussed. Play production is studied from the viewpoints of the playwright, actor, director, and theater technicians. Attendance at current community theater production is desirable. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Acting I is an introduction to craft: the balance of external technique and internal elements in order to create a flexible but consistent process that can be used to create believable characters in a variety of settings. The class is a combination of theory and practice. Students are exposed to major post-Stanislavkian acting theories that are applied in scene and partner work. This class will include students from multiple sections. (P,Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

General introduction to the works of Shakespeare, emphasizing the plays: tragedies, comedies, histories, and romances. Approaches Shakespeare both as poetry and as drama, concerning itself with language and with staging. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Beginning writing in fiction and poetry, other modes by request. Workshop approach, with discussion of work by class members and instructor. Reading of contemporary fiction, poetry, and theory. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Survey of world literature from diverse cultures and periods, including historical contexts. Selections will vary by quarter but will include translations from African, Eastern, Latin, and Western literatures. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Students will learn the elements of art and apply them to critiques of art works submitted to Tidepools art and literature magazine. Students will also learn the elements of fiction and poetry, and use them to critique creative writing submissions. Students will gain editing skills and practice communication skills while selecting, editing, and preparing art and creative writing for publication. Students will learn ethical, historical, and philosophical aspects of editing while serving as editors and will create and release a print magazine along with promotional materials, and will author and edit press releases, posters, and advertisements. This class may include students from multiple sections.(Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Students will learn the elements of art and apply them to critiques of art works submitted to Tidepools art and literature magazine. Students will also learn the elements of fiction and poetry, and use them to critique creative writing submissions. Students will gain editing skills and practice communication skills while selecting, editing, and preparing art and creative writing for publication. Students will learn ethical, historical, and philosophical aspects of editing while serving as editors and will create and release a print magazine along with promotional materials, and will author and edit press releases, posters, and advertisements. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Students will learn the elements of art and apply them to critiques of art works submitted to Tidepools art and literature magazine. Students will also learn the elements of fiction and poetry, and use them to critique creative writing submissions. Students will gain editing skills and practice communication skills while selecting, editing, and preparing art and creative writing for publication. Students will learn ethical, historical, and philosophical aspects of editing while serving as editors and will create and release a print magazine along with promotional materials, and will author and edit press releases, posters, and advertisements. This class may include students from multiple sections.(Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

An examination of the variety and diversity of literature that forms a part of the imaginative experience of children and adolescents, as well as a part of a larger literary heritage, viewed in the light of their social, psychological, political, and moral implications. Exploration of book format, major genres, and works buy notable authors and illustrators. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

An examination of literary works from a variety of cultural perspectives. Contemporary texts and local guest speakers from different cultures increase students’ awareness and understanding of the values, beliefs, stories, interests, and experiences of those cultures. Students define their own cultural identity and participate in service learning. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Study of film as visual text, including key terms, primary practitioners, and major developments. Examination of film as transmitter of themes and values. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Introduction to study of film genre through looking at either one or several film genres, including literary, mythic, historic, and theoretical aspects. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Exploration of connected works of literature and film. The films and texts may be direct adaptations of each other or may be connected thematically. The course will focus on a specific overall theme, genre, historical period, and/or author. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Beginning script writing for film and television. Combination small lecture/workshop approach focusing on techniques, formats, and structure of scripts; plot and character development. Co-listed with MEDIA 140. This class will include students from multiple sections. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

FRCH& 123 or KLA 123 or SPAN& 123  +
5
5

Introduction to a range of artistic and intellectual expressions of what it means to be human. Areas explored may include architecture, dance, film, language, literature, music, painting, philosophy, photography, sculpture, and/ or theater. Discussion of these expressions, themes and styles, as well as their cultural, historical, and theoretical contexts. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Exploration of thematic and stylistic connections between art forms, focusing on both theory and creative application. Art forms may include painting, photography, sculpture, dance, poetry, fiction, theater, film, and music. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Historical as well as cross-cultural study of popular literary and nonliterary texts, such as novels, magazines, comic books, films, television shows, advertisements, social media, superhero tales, music videos, and fashion trends. Focus on popular myths, icons, heroes, and/ or rituals that have affected peoples’ lives and attitudes. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Introduction to a range of artistic and intellectual expressions of what it means to be human with particular attention to distinct paradigms that reflect indigenous history, culture, arts, and philosophies. Areas of attention/concentration include but are not limited to architecture, dance, film, language, literature, music, painting, philosophy, sculpture, and performance. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

An introductory course that explores the nature of knowledge and its pursuit from the primary academic disciplines of mathematics, humanities, natural sciences and social sciences. An emphasis is placed on establishing linkages across these disciplines to expand the realm of possible discourse. Students will develop and apply critical thinking, communication, and self-assessment skills, along with the ability to integrate multiple perspectives. As part of the class, students will engage in interdisciplinary readings and discussions of seminal ideas on a common theme to be determined by the instructor. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Exploration of how and why we listen to music. Examination of the many roles that music plays in various world cultures. Musical examples drawn from Asia, Africa, Indonesia, North and South America (including Native American tribal groups), jazz, blues, and the Western classical tradition. No prior musical experience is necessary. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Develops musicianship through study and application of compositional elements. Emphasis on musical notation, aural skills, and aesthetic musical values. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

A cultural/sociological history of pop music in the USA. Musical antecedents (blues, country, rhythm and blues) and outside influences (African drumming, Latin rhythms, folksingers) will be included, but the focus will be on the pop music of this period. The music will be addressed within the context of societal issues such as racism, conformity, generational conflict, governmental repression and censorship. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Examination of central issues from each major branch of philosophy. Emphasis on understanding and evaluating diverse answers to philosophical questions about human knowledge, existence, and moral values. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Study of informal logic. Emphasis on methods for identifying arguments, detecting common fallacies, and applying principles of correct inductive reasoning. Designed to improve rational thinking skills as applied to both belief and action. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Introduction to moral theory and its application to contemporary moral issues. Potential topics include nihilism, relativism, utilitarianism, Kant, legal punishment, distributive justice, terrorism, abortion, animal rights, and euthanasia. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Continuation of SPANISH V. Mastery of listening, reading, writing, and speaking; review of previous material; introduction to Spanish literature and history; continued study of culture. Learner-centered instruction. (Humanities)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

Sub-Total Credits
15

Natural Sciences

Minimum of fifteen credits from Natural Sciences distribution in three separate subject areas. At least five credits must be a lab.

Lab Requirement

Catalog #
Title
Credits
5

Hands-on approach utilizing facilities at local marine laboratory, field trips, and group projects to learn biological concepts relevant to marine biology. Emphasis on local organisms and ecology. This class will include students from multiple sections. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

First course in the two-quarter sequence of introductory biology for forestry students. Topics include cell structure and function, cellular energy metabolism, photosynthesis, genetics, and various facets of zoology, including anatomy and physiology, physiological ecology, and development. Current research will be used to illustrate the scientific and social importance of these topics. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Second course in the two-quarter sequence of introductory biology for forestry students. Topics include plant growth and survival, photosynthesis, and plant/ environmental interactions, evolution and diversity of living plants and animals, fundamentals of ecology, and conservation biology. Current research will be used to illustrate the scientific and social importance of these topics. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Introduction to the structural and functional characteristics of life. Surveys the evolutionary, ecological, cellular, and genetic biology of living organisms. This class will include students from multiple sections. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Includes process of science, overview of central ideas of biology (unity, diversity, interdependence, evolution), basic chemistry concepts, biomolecules, cell structure, cell physiology (including enzyme function, energetics, synthesis of DNA, RNA and protein), cell reproduction, introduction to genetics. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

First course in the three-quarter sequence of introductory biology for science students. An introduction to evolutionary and ecological processes involved in the generation of our planet’s biodiversity, including a review of patterns and processes that influence the origin, evolution, distribution, and abundance of living things. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Second course in the three-quarter sequence of introductory biology for science students. Introduction to structure and function of biomolecules, cells, and membranes; photosynthesis and respiration; molecular origin of life; phylogenetic and metabolic diversity of prokaryotes; and molecular genetics and genomics. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Third course in the three-quarter sequence of introductory biology for science students. Introduction to the study of the structure and function of plants and animals and how they cope with varying environmental conditions. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Introduction to bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms. Includes microbial structure, metabolism, genetics, ecology, technological applications, microbial diseases of humans, immunology, public health, and medical control strategies. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Introduction to general plant biology. Anatomy, physiology, and diversity of common protists, fungi, and plants, with emphasis on plants of the Pacific Northwest. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Introduction to chemistry covering selected principles and their effect on ourselves and our environment. Intended for non-science majors wishing to improve their science literacy and develop a long-term interest in science. Includes online lab. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

For individuals with little or no chemistry background. Atomic nature of matter, chemical bonding, periodic table, chemical reactions, phases of matter, solutions, equilibrium, reaction rates, and nuclear reactions. Includes laboratory.  This class may include students from multiple sections. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

For science and engineering majors. This course focuses on the fundamentals of chemical structures: atomic nature of matter, atomic structure, periodic trends, quantum concepts, molecular structure, and chemical reactions.  Three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory.  This class may include students from multiple sections. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

An interdisciplinary science course for both non-science majors and science students. Topics include the practice of environmental science, ecological principles, demographics, forest and wildlife resources, energy, planning, climate change, and pollution. Underlying scientific principles and practices, including the exploration and presentation of scientific uncertainty, are identified and related to societal issues. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Introduction to geology and survey of the processes that shape the surface of the earth, including water, wind, ice, and gravity. Topics covered include: plate tectonics, volcanism, earthquakes, the geologic time scale, and concepts of mineralogy and petrology. Lab included. Field trips may be required. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

An introduction to physics intended for students not majoring in science. Topics include basic coverage of motion, force, energy, momentum, gravity, electricity and magnetism, light, waves, and relativity. Course includes one lab credit. (Natural Science, Elective)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Basic principles of physics presented without use of calculus. Suitable for students majoring in technically oriented fields other than engineering or the physical sciences. Mechanics. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Introduction to the animal phyla. Studies of animal anatomy, physiology, behavior, ecology, and evolution illustrate the diversity and unity of animal life. Emphasis on animals of the Pacific Northwest. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

Sub-Total Credits
5

Requirements

Catalog #
Title
Credits
5

A survey of humankind from a biological perspective. Includes human evolution and variation, hominid phylogeny and taxonomic theory, and the interaction between human biology, behavior, and culture. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Introduction to the structural and functional characteristics of life. Surveys the evolutionary, ecological, cellular, and genetic biology of living organisms. This class will include students from multiple sections. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Includes process of science, overview of central ideas of biology (unity, diversity, interdependence, evolution), basic chemistry concepts, biomolecules, cell structure, cell physiology (including enzyme function, energetics, synthesis of DNA, RNA and protein), cell reproduction, introduction to genetics. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

First course in the three-quarter sequence of introductory biology for science students. An introduction to evolutionary and ecological processes involved in the generation of our planet’s biodiversity, including a review of patterns and processes that influence the origin, evolution, distribution, and abundance of living things. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Second course in the three-quarter sequence of introductory biology for science students. Introduction to structure and function of biomolecules, cells, and membranes; photosynthesis and respiration; molecular origin of life; phylogenetic and metabolic diversity of prokaryotes; and molecular genetics and genomics. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Third course in the three-quarter sequence of introductory biology for science students. Introduction to the study of the structure and function of plants and animals and how they cope with varying environmental conditions. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Introduction to bacteria, viruses, and other microorganisms. Includes microbial structure, metabolism, genetics, ecology, technological applications, microbial diseases of humans, immunology, public health, and medical control strategies. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Hands-on approach utilizing facilities at local marine laboratory, field trips, and group projects to learn biological concepts relevant to marine biology. Emphasis on local organisms and ecology. This class will include students from multiple sections. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

First course in the two-quarter sequence of introductory biology for forestry students. Topics include cell structure and function, cellular energy metabolism, photosynthesis, genetics, and various facets of zoology, including anatomy and physiology, physiological ecology, and development. Current research will be used to illustrate the scientific and social importance of these topics. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Second course in the two-quarter sequence of introductory biology for forestry students. Topics include plant growth and survival, photosynthesis, and plant/ environmental interactions, evolution and diversity of living plants and animals, fundamentals of ecology, and conservation biology. Current research will be used to illustrate the scientific and social importance of these topics. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Introduction to general plant biology. Anatomy, physiology, and diversity of common protists, fungi, and plants, with emphasis on plants of the Pacific Northwest. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Introduction to chemistry covering selected principles and their effect on ourselves and our environment. Intended for non-science majors wishing to improve their science literacy and develop a long-term interest in science. Includes online lab. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

For individuals with little or no chemistry background. Atomic nature of matter, chemical bonding, periodic table, chemical reactions, phases of matter, solutions, equilibrium, reaction rates, and nuclear reactions. Includes laboratory.  This class may include students from multiple sections. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

For science and engineering majors. This course focuses on the fundamentals of chemical structures: atomic nature of matter, atomic structure, periodic trends, quantum concepts, molecular structure, and chemical reactions.  Three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory.  This class may include students from multiple sections. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

CSC 100 or PHIL& 120  +
5
5

An interdisciplinary science course for both non-science majors and science students. Topics include the practice of environmental science, ecological principles, demographics, forest and wildlife resources, energy, planning, climate change, and pollution. Underlying scientific principles and practices, including the exploration and presentation of scientific uncertainty, are identified and related to societal issues. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Explores past and present contributions from major events and leaders to the sustainability movement. It combines the basic ways natural systems work with an understanding of economics, social equity, and ecology, followed by a critical analysis of the societal value and environmental impact of trends in sustainability. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

A survey of Earth science including topics on rock and mineral characteristics, natural hazards, surface and groundwater environments, marine and continental environments, resources, land-forms, and global climate change. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Introduction to geology and survey of the processes that shape the surface of the earth, including water, wind, ice, and gravity. Topics covered include: plate tectonics, volcanism, earthquakes, the geologic time scale, and concepts of mineralogy and petrology. Lab included. Field trips may be required. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Introduction to historical geology and paleontology. Studies the formation and development through time of the solid Earth, atmosphere, and biosphere. Covers past movements and locations of the continents and interpretation of past environments as recorded in rock and fossil records as well as the history of life and how living organisms evolved over geologic time from the first single-celled organisms through the first invertebrates, vertebrates and plants, to the dinosaurs, and on to the rise of the mammals and early hominids. Includes the chance to examine fossils of early life, various invertebrates, fish, other prehistoric animals, and ancient plants. Lab included. Field trips may be required. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Explores processes that form and shape the earth. These processes comprise a series of integrated systems that interact to produce the earth's continents, oceans, atmosphere, and life. Lab included. Field trips may be required. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

A study of a variety of mathematical topics for non-science majors. The topics covered may differ between sections, but may include problem solving strategies, logic, set theory, number theory, mathematics of finance, probability and statistics, or geometry. This class will include students from multiple sections. (Quantitative Skills, Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Analysis of linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, rational, and radical functions and their graphs; linear and nonlinear inequalities; systems of equations; and matrices. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Quantitative Skills, Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Conic sections; trigonometric functions; identities, inverse trigonometric functions; trigonometric equations; solutions of right triangles, laws of sines and cosines; vectors, polar coordinates, and complex numbers, sequences, series, binomial theorem. This class will include students from multiple sections. (Quantitative Skills, Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Introduction to methods and applications of elementary descriptive and inferential statistics; summarizing data graphically and numerically, probability, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation and linear regression. This class will include students from multiple sections. (Quantitative Skills, Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Limits, rates of change, graphing, differentiating, optimizing, polynomials, integration, logarithmic and exponential functions, implicit differentiation, business applications. (Quantitative Skills, Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Limits and continuity; derivatives of algebraic and trig functions; chain rule, implicit differentiation and applications, an introduction to antiderivatives. This class will include students from multiple sections. (Quantitative Skills, Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Calculus of exponential, log, and inverse trig functions; methods of integration; applications of integration; introduction to differential equations; and mathematical modeling. (Quantitative Skills, Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Sequences, series, Taylor expansions. Vectors, vector functions, space curves. Functions of several variables, partial derivatives, tangent planes. This class will include students from multiple sections. (Quantitative Skills, Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Methods topics include teaching the usage of technology. Math topics include algebra, geometry, measurement, and statistics. This course satisfies the quantitative skills requirement for the AA degree, provided that Math for Elementary Teachers I has also been completed satisfactorily. (Quantitative, Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

The study of linear, quadratic, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions, and solving their related equations; systems of equations; matrices; linear programming (graphically); and the mathematics of finance. This class may include students from multiple sections. (Quantitative Skills, Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Basic principles of nutrition across the lifespan. Details the digestive process, the digestion and absorption of macro and micronutrients including vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients. Examines the role of nutrition in the maintenance of optimal health and disease prevention. Includes analysis of personal dietary habits and the components of a healthful diet. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

General survey of geological, physical, chemical, and biological oceanography. Includes history of oceanography, origin of ocean basins, plate tectonics, sea floor, waves, tides, currents, properties of water, composition of seawater, ocean productivity, pelagic environment, benthic environment, coastal processes, marine resources, and pollution. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

An introduction to physics intended for students not majoring in science. Topics include basic coverage of motion, force, energy, momentum, gravity, electricity and magnetism, light, waves, and relativity. Course includes one lab credit. (Natural Science, Elective)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Basic principles of physics presented without use of calculus. Suitable for students majoring in technically oriented fields other than engineering or the physical sciences. Mechanics. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Introduction to the universe, with emphasis on conceptual, as contrasted with mathematical, comprehension. Modern theories and observations; ideas concerning nature and evolution of galaxies; quasars, stars, black holes, planets, and solar system.  This class may include students from multiple sections.  (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Introduction to the animal phyla. Studies of animal anatomy, physiology, behavior, ecology, and evolution illustrate the diversity and unity of animal life. Emphasis on animals of the Pacific Northwest. (Natural Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

Sub-Total Credits
10

Social Sciences

Requirements

Minimum of fifteen credits from Social Science distribution in three separate subject areas. 

Catalog #
Title
Credits
5

Introduction for nonmajors to study of humans as biological and cultural beings. Includes surveys of archaeology and physical, cultural, and linguistic anthropology to examine human biological and cultural evolution, culture, and cultural systems.  This class may include students from multiple sections. (Social Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Introduction to study of recent cultures and societies. Focus on development of anthropological thought, language, culture, and broad patterns of cultural behavior. Includes cross-cultural perspectives on belief systems, economic behavior, family, kinship, and sociopolitical structures.  This class may include students from multiple sections.  (Social Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Promotes use of critical thinking to explore an individual's relationship to the supply and demand of goods and services. Tools of economic analysis are used to investigate management of environmental systems. (Social Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Presents economic theories used as tools for critical thinking to show how the U.S. economy operates. Emphasis on causes and consequences of unemployment and inflation and how they affect the well-being of Americans. The use of government spending, taxation, and the monetary system to promote full employment and stable prices will be examined. Explores role of energy and natural resources in shaping our economic future. (Social Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Introduction to fundamental economic concepts through contemporary social issues. Examine how societies deal with limited resources and social, cultural, and political responses to changing economic conditions. Recommended for those seeking a greater understanding of economics and contemporary issues. (Social Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Historical comparative study of the world’s major civilizations (African, Asian, Middle East, European, and American) from prehistory to ca.1200 CE. There will be an emphasis on material existence and understanding value systems. We will delve into how these are expressed in different political, social, economic, cultural, and religious systems as well as in literature and art. (Social Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Comparative study of the world’s major civilizations (African, Asian, Middle East, European, and American) from roughly 1200 CE to 1815. There will be an emphasis on material existence and understanding value systems. We will delve into how these are expressed in different political, social, economic, cultural and religious systems as well as in literature and art. (Social Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Comparative historical study of the world's major civilizations (African, Asian, Middle East, European, and American) from the beginning of industrialization to today’s global world. There will be an emphasis on material existence and understanding value systems. We will delve into how these are expressed in different political, social, economic, cultural, and religious systems as well as in literature and art. (Social Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

United States development from European settlements clinging tenuously on the Atlantic coast, or wayward outposts in the Southeast and Southwest, to a large .relatively unified nation between two oceans. We will examine the people of North America, Europe and Africa before colonialism and then address the social, cultural, economic and geographical determinants for colonization. We will explore how colonists began to see themselves separate from the mother country and how this resulted in revolution and a new nation. (Social Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

United States evolvement after the early years of nation building. The course will begin at the end of the Jacksonian Reform era, and end with the period of overseas expansion as the United States become a Great Power nation. This course will examine a number of crisis or issues of change, including civil war, western expansion, industrialization, immigration and urbanization. The student will learn how the people of the United States responded to crisis periods through reform movements such as Populism, unionization, Progressivism and imperialism. (Social Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

The third part of the History of the United States examines the 20th century starting with World War I. In this period attention directed toward the development of the United States as a modern nation-state. We will cover the process industrialization, urbanization, and immigration that shaped the contours of the country right into the 21st century. Other topics of interest in the larger processes will be the Great Depression, Imperialism, World War I and II, the Cold War, environmentalism, nuclear war and terrorism. The course will end as the United States enters the post-Cold War era. (Social Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Introduction to the core issues and approaches used to understand the international system. The study of international relations broadly encompasses the fields of political economy and international security, both of which will be covered in this course, along with increasingly prominent cross-border issues that require global governance (countries working together to resolve problems). (Social Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

This course introduces us to political systems and governments in different countries. We will learn some core approaches, concepts, themes, and theories that will help us understand, analyze, and compare domestic politics and institutions seen around the world. (Social Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Introductory course aimed at familiarizing the student with important ideas and ideologies that have shaped the contemporary world. Ideologies to be explored include Liberalism, Conservatism, Socialism, Nationalism, Fascism, etc. We will explore the philosophical foundations that undergird different political and economic systems in the world. To promote a deeper understanding, we will also read a selection of original works of major contributors within the ideological traditions. (Social Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Introduction to science of behavior. Emphasis on biological foundations of behavior, cognition, learning, intelligence, motivation, memory, personality, and psychological disorders. This class will include students from multiple sections. (Social Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Introductory course to develop the analytical skills necessary to understand major developments in the contemporary world and to provide the basis for more advanced study in the field of world politics. The course deepens students’ understanding of globalization and the need for common solutions to global problems that transcend borders. This class will include students from multiple sections. (Social Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Human social behavior, social institutions, and society from sociological perspective. Includes introduction to sociological theory and research and application to topics such as social structure, socialization, deviance, inequality, and stratification. (Social Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

Examines elements that create differences within society and exposes learners to a variety of cultural ideas that will lead to a better understanding of people who are different. Culture, ethnicity, lifestyle, religion, disabilities, age, and gender issues will be examined. (Social Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

5

This class is an exploration of the role gender and sexuality play in major institutions such as the media, economy, family, education, and politics in American society today. The class will lay particular emphasis on the intersection of gender, sexuality, race, class, and age in shaping contemporary inequalities. Major theoretical approaches to gender and sexuality will also be introduced. (Social Science)

Credits: 5

View Full Course

Sub-Total Credits
15